Updates: Moving On

It’s been a while since I last posted so this post will be a general update. I finished working at the Jerusalem Botanical Gardens at the end of August. Following this I moved to Edinburgh to study at the RBGE. The next four years will be spent on a degree.

I hoped to continue blogging but was caught out by the workload of my first term. I guess a appropriate new years resolution would be to blog more. This really should be the case. I’m currently on break from my studies and staying at Great Dixter. After this I’m heading to the USA. Both locations should provide plenty to photograph and share.

Over the next few weeks I will update my blog information and share more posts.

Above: Hydrangea quercifolia at Great Dixter

Astrantia major subsp. involucrata ‘Shaggy’

Astrantia major subsp. involucrata ‘Shaggy’ is a real winner, especially in Northern England. This species grows best in a damp, sunny spot. Blooming begins in June and continues well into October. The cultivar ‘Shaggy’ has notably larger flowers than others. These are produced plentifully throughout the blooming months.

Today I took some photos of Astrantia major subsp. involucrata ‘Shaggy’ in the garden. This plant is only a year old and is already providing a strong display. The photos are below, including a nice macro bee shot 👌

Eco Gardening – Green Wall

In the garden at the Palestine Natural History Museum, a green wall is being prepared. The aim is to grow plants vertically on the wall. For this green wall hessian bags of compost are attached to the existing wall. These bags will then be planted. Photos below show the current progress, even at this stage it’s aesthetically pleasing.

Welwitschia mirabilis, Seed

Welwitschia mirabilis is a species I never cease to be excited about. This species is endemic to the Namib desert, in Namibia and Angola. It is a monotypic species. Which appears to have remained unchanged for tens, maybe even hundreds, of millions of years. Pretty incredible, but it gets better!

W. mirabilis produces two cotyledons upon germination. These grow into two leaves. These leaves remain as the plants only leaves, for its entire life. Each leaf can reach four metres in length. Considering W. mirabilis can live for over a thousand years, its amazing.

Eli (head gardener) ordered some seeds a while ago and they came yesterday. They were soaked for 24 hours then sown in deep tubes. W. mirabilis resents root disturbance, so it must be repotted before it reaches the base of the tube.